A Look At Gingivitis And Periodontal Disease

A Look At Gingivitis And Periodontal Disease

Gum disease, also known as gingivitis, is a serious condition that will normally result in tooth loss. With adults, gingivitis and periodontal disease are the most common forms of gum disease. To prevent both types of gum disease, you should always brush your teeth and remove as much plaque as possible. If you allow the plaque to build up, gum disease will normally be the result.

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Understanding Toothaches

Understanding Toothaches

As we all know, toothaches are the result of several different factors. The pain that stems from a toothache is always apparent, normally in the form of throbbing. The pain will normally intensify as time goes by, when you eat, lay down, or drink hot/cold liquids. Toothaches are very painful, and it may seem that no matter what you do – it seems to hurt more.

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Getting Kids To Brush Up On Proper Oral Hygiene

Getting Kids To Brush Up On Proper Oral Hygiene

Though parents may have reason to smile at the recent improvements in dental care in the United States, tooth decay is still one of the most common childhood diseases, according to the American Dental Association (ADA). It is five times as common as asthma in 5-17-year-olds, according to the association. And it affects more than one-fifth of American children aged 2-4, half of those aged 6-8 and nearly 60 percent of those aged 15, according to the National Center for Health Statistics.

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Three Things You Can Do to Reduce Your Child’s Fear of the Dentist

Three Things You Can Do to Reduce Your Child’s Fear of the Dentist

Sometimes, no matter what you do, children become a little fearful of the dentist. It may happen because they hear something from friends or family. It can happen if they’re at the dentist and another child is having a problem. It can also happen naturally because a dental cleaning can be an uncomfortable process, especially if there are a few issues.

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All About Tooth Decay

All About Tooth Decay

In order for tooth decay to be developed in a tooth, that tooth must have acid producing bacteria around it, along with food for the bacteria to feed upon. Teeth that are susceptible to decay will have little to no fluoride in the enamel to fight the plaque. Fluoride can destroy decay, although it won’t be able to do much once the decay has started to eat the teeth.

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Dealing With Infections

Dealing With Infections

Once a tooth has been extracted, bacteria will still be alive in the mouth, even more so with those who have bad oral hygiene. Infections are very common following extractions. Depending on how bad the tooth was that the dentist removed, they may prescribe you some antibiotics to take that will greatly reduce your risk of getting an infection. In some cases though, even antibiotics can’t prevent an infection.

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Getting Kids To Brush Up On Proper Oral Hygiene

Getting Kids To Brush Up On Proper Oral Hygiene

Though parents may have reason to smile at the recent improvements in dental care in the United States, tooth decay is still one of the most common childhood diseases, according to the American Dental Association (ADA). It is five times as common as asthma in 5-17-year-olds, according to the association. And it affects more than one-fifth of American children aged 2-4, half of those aged 6-8 and nearly 60 percent of those aged 15, according to the National Center for Health Statistics.

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Why It’s Important for Children to Go to the Dentist

Why It’s Important for Children to Go to the Dentist

Dental care starts the day your baby is born. Before teeth emerge, the gums need to be gently swabbed with a soft, damp cloth once a day. Once the teeth begin to grow it’s up to the parent to gently brush those tiny new teeth.

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Smoking Is Slowly Killing Your Teeth

Smoking Is Slowly Killing Your Teeth

There are many who consider smoking to be one of the filthiest, least healthy habits a person can have. The typical non-smoker finds cigarette smoke distasteful at best, disgusting at worst. There are also a number of side effects that smoking can have on the body which are damaging, particularly in the long-run. The fact that second-hand smoke does even more damage to non-smokers than it does to smokers does nothing to endear the habit to anyone. However, aside from the obvious respiratory and circulatory repercussions, there are other problems that are associated with smoking. In fact, smokers nowadays make up 50% of people with gum disease in the world.

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Can Eating Disorders Affect Your Teeth?

Can Eating Disorders Affect Your Teeth?

People that are battling with eating disorders, expose themselves to many potential dental problems with devastating effects. Such effects could include loosing of your teeth, gum problems and erosion of the enamel as a result of teeth being bathed in stomach acid. Another effect is your enamel will be worn out and in some cases your teeth will even appear black. In addition, people with eating disorders lack necessary nutrients which can result in osteoporosis, weakening of the bones in the jaw that support your teeth and can lead to tooth loss. More so, they will have jagged edges on the top teeth surfaces, causing lower teeth to hit wrong “places” because of altered biting direction. Many people suffer from bleeding gums and burning of the tongue, dry mouth due to decrease in saliva flow and swollen glands. All these problems are caused by a variety of eating disorders.

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